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KING ARTHUR FLOUR - SOURDOUGH STARTER TIPS 4

Category:    Bread
Yield:1 servings
 
           -DEBBIE CARLSON   (PHHW01A)              -KING ARTHUR FLOUR HINTS
 
  (CONTINUED) TROUGLESHOOTING
  
  Feeding Without Baking:  "If you have been busy or away, you can always
  feed your starter without baking anything. Stir the mixture together, take
  out and discard 1 cup of starter and replenish as above, stirring in 1 cup
  water and 1 cup flour. (Or instead of discarding the starter you removed,
  ask a neighbor if he or she would be interested in adopting a starter of
  his/her very own.)  Let the resuscitated mixture sit at room temperature
  for 12 hours or so before you return it to the refrigerator."
  
  Treating a "Sluggish" Starter:  "If you feel that your starter is just not
  "up to snuff," dissolve a teaspoon of yeast in the cup of water you mix
  into the starter when you feed it. (If you live in an area where water is
  chlorinated, let some sit out overnight to allow the chlorine to dissipate
  to preclude any interference with the development of the sourdough
  micro-organisms)."
  
  Sweetening a Starter:  "If your starter becomes too sour, take out 1 cup,
  dispose of the remainder, and add 2 cups of each of flour and water to
  refreshen it."
  
  Increasing Your Starter:  "If you want to grow a large amount of starter to
  give some to a friend or to do a lot of baking, simply increase the amount
  you feed it."
  
  Resuscitating a Neglected Starter:  "If your sourdough starter has sat in
  the refrigerator months beyond the point of health, give it a fighting
  chance for survival before you throw it out. A little warmth and a good
  meal of strong, high energy carbohydrates may be all it needs to get it off
  and running again."
  
  "The layer of liquid on the surface will probably be very dark, making it
  look as if the starter must surely have expired. Quell your fear, wrestle
  the top off the jar and give it a sniff. If it smells the way it should,
  though exceptionally sour, it may just be sitting there in a dormant state
  waiting to be fed. The only way to know is to give it a meal."
  
  "Blend it back together and pour it into a glass or ceramic bowl. (Take
  this opportunity to give its jar a good wash.) As the starter will probably
  be quite thin, mix in 2 cups of flour and 1 cup of water to nourish and
  thicken it. Leave the bowl out on the counter where it will be warm and
  visible." 
 

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